Maverick Traveler

Location Independence, Geo Arbitrage, Individual Freedom

How To Become Successful If You Don’t Have A Lot Of Money And Connections

Call me a masochist but I’ve always seemed to choose the hard way when embarking on any mission, whether it’s building a new business, learning a new language or completing some other ambitious task. Although I’ve heard of others finding an easy way or shortcut, I’ve rarely experienced this myself. Today, I want to teach you my mindset of approaching, embarking and conquering even the most difficult challenges.

First, let’s define the word “success.” I define success as a point in your endeavor where each addition (marginal) effort you make results in a much greater output. For instance, if you’re running a successful business, you no longer need to frantically hustle 24-7 trying different things, you simply need to work several hours per day and the business will not only continue working on autopilot but will keep growing. This is very different when you’re just starting the business because all your efforts and energy is employed on figuring out what works and finding traction.

This concept is applicable to any endeavor. If you’re learning a foreign language, the first few weeks (and months) must be spent on merely learning how to read (if the alphabet is different) and memorizing very simple words and phrases. After you’ve built the base, things get a lot easier because you can leverage what you’ve learned to absorb more and more stuff.

Thus, if I’m learning Japanese, and I’ve learned enough where I’m at a point where I can have a very basic conversation with a local, it’ll be a lot easier to learn more phrases and expressions. That’s not the case when I’m starting at zero and must spend all my time memorizing Japanese characters before I can even learn the words such as “Hello” or “Thank you.”

In other words, regardless of the endeavor, there are startup costs that must be factored in before you start seeing any return on your effort.

This stage is the toughest mentally. Most people quit here. More people usually quit before their new business gains their first customers compared to the number of people who quit while trying to scale their business from $5,000/mo to $50,000/mo.

More people quit learning Russian before they could string basic phrases together compared to people who’ve quit after they were able to have a conversation but got discouraged because they couldn’t read Leo Tolstoy’s War and Piece.

Realistic expectations

The first rule of overcoming this hurdle is to have realistic expectations. From my experience, I’ve noticed that many people have very unrealistic expectations. A few years ago, a student applied to my mentoring program. When I asked him what he wanted to achieve, he replied that he wants to make $500/day within a month and move to Bali. Oh, and he also had zero business experience.

Here’s a perfect example of unrealistic expectations. Of course, people do make that much online (I have good friends that make much more), but they certainly didn’t get to those numbers overnight. It took them months/years of trial and error to get there.

When learning a foreign language, an unrealistic expectation is becoming super fluent in a week or a month. While you can certainly become conversational in a month or two (or less, depending on the language), becoming fluent will take much longer because fluency means knowing everything in the language and you simply can’t learn all aspects of a foreign language is a month. There aren’t enough hours to do it. Unless you completely suspend any notion of reality, you simply can’t learn what took someone 20 or 30 years to learn in a space of just few months.

Having unrealistic expectations dooms from you the start. You give up much quicker because you feel that anything short of making $500/day or learning fluent Chinese in a month means you’re an utter failure. That’s absolutely the wrong mindset.

The key is to start with healthy realistic expectations. When it comes to building an online biz, a realistic expectation would be to make something like $30-50/day. That’s absolutely doable and you can build a game plan for achieving that.

If your objective is to learn a foreign language, a good milestone would be to hold a 3-minute conversation with a native speaker. That doesn’t require advanced knowledge so you can achieve this level fairly quickly.

When I moved to Brazil years ago, my goal was to learn Portuguese. I actually couldn’t care less about was fluency; I just wanted to have conversations with locals. I achieved that objective in a couple of months. Sure, my Portuguese is not “fluent”; but it’s a lot easier to become “fluent” now that I’m conversational than if my goal was “fluency or bust” from the start.

The base belief

Although there are people who have unrealistic goals and the blind confidence that they will achieve these goals tomorrow morning, there are also people who don’t believe that something is possible because of low-esteem or other factors.

Let’s clear the air here. It’s 2018. The Internet is over 20 years old, and people still ask questions like “Is it possible to make online?” to “Do Google Ads work?” to “I heard Facebook Advertising doesn’t work” to “Do blogs make money?”

I used to entertain these questions. No longer. The way I see it, these questions are philosophical in nature. If you’re a philosopher and you want to discuss the meaning of life or existentialism, that’s great, but I’m not a philosopher—I’m here to help you build a business.

Before you start any endeavor, you need a certain amount of base belief. If you move to Japan, you must believe that you will be able to learn conversational Japanese. If you move to the Middle East, you must believe that you’ll be able to learn conversational Arabic.

Similarly, if you’re starting a business or learning online marketing, you must believe that you’ll eventually build that business and learn marketing. You must believe that you’ll eventually get the hang of Facebook advertising, Google Adwords or something else, and start to make $30-50/day consistently—at least at the start.

This is an absolute must. It’s not negotiable. I don’t care who you are or your past failures, but you must absolutely know in your gut that with enough time and perseverance, you’ll get to a point where you’ll achieve a certain level of success. You don’t need to become a millionaire overnight, but you must know that you will at least make something online.

Now, if you’re someone who read the above and immediately countered, “But James! I don’t know about that—9/10 businesses fail,” I’m sorry but you’ve failed the test. You need to do some introspection and fix your mindset (or find another website).

Let’s imagine you’re building an online store. You know nothing about building an online store. You know nothing about marketing. You know nothing about websites or tools or WordPress plugins. You know nothing about sales funnels. That’s fine. All of that is secondary. At the very least, you must at least know that someone out there will give you some money for your product one way or another. That’s your base belief.

Or, let’s say you had to pack up everything and move to China tomorrow (I’ve actually been thinking about visiting China for a while). You also know that you would need to learn Chinese. Well, you must absolutely know that you will at least become somewhat conversational in Chinese. It might be the crappiest Chinese in the world, but you must know deep in your gut that will string some Chinese words together and the other person will at least understand you. Remember, we’re not talking about fluency in any way, shape or form.

This is one of the most important things to internalize. Everything starts from here. If you don’t have this minimal level of this base belief, don’t even bother starting.

One of my first businesses was selling physical products on eBay back in 2005. My background was mostly in selling digital products and advertising, so I had zero experience selling physical products. But I saw a product that was selling well, imported it from China and listed it on eBay. The result: I was profitable from day one. Even before I started, I knew I would succeed one way or another. I didn’t care about making millions, I just wanted to make few bucks and grow from there.

Obsession

The next rule with becoming successful is that you must be absolutely obsessive about it. This is also not negotiable. You must feel that you have to succeed at all costs (within limits, of course).

Forget motivation. Forget some fuzzy feeling of happiness or whatever the hell that even means. None of that matters. What matters is your absolute determination to crack the puzzle. And to crack the puzzle, it’s not enough to treat it as some hobby that you do in your spare time like that 200-page book you’ve been “reading” for a year.

It needs to become a central focus in your life. I don’t want to say it must consume your life, but that’s a good way of putting it. The more obsessed you are, the faster you will succeed. I will go a step further and say that if you’re truly obsessed with succeeding, it’s not really a question of “if”—it’s a question of “when.”

One way to become obsessed is to want it bad enough. You must be in such state of pain that you simply must do something—anything—to change it. Ten years ago, I wanted desperately to leave the Bay Area and move to Brazil. The only way to do that was to build a side business to finance that lifestyle. Casey Neistat, in one of his videos, mentioned that his drive to succeed came from hating his life (he was living in a trailer park and working two jobs).

One of the guys I’m currently mentoring hates his current country and wants to move abroad. It’s this rebellion against his current situation that will eventually propel him to succeed. Nobody has ever succeeded by reading a business book while being completely comfortable with everything in their life.

Brute forcing success

There are several ways to speed up this grind. Money is one way. Money buys time. When you have money at your disposal, you’re able to buy experts, buy data, buy people and pretty much anything else. This will allow you get results quicker.

Of course, if you had a million dollars at your disposal, you wouldn’t be reading this article and following this path because you most likely have a competitive advantage that you can exploit.

If you’re starting from scratch, you really can’t buy time and expertise, so your only option is to grind it out. And to do that you must “brute force” success.

If you’re not familiar with this term, it means trying everything until you get the outcome you want. Brute forcing a combination lock means trying to open the lock by trying every possible combination. It’s the complete opposite of finding shortcuts or tips. It’s also the complete opposite of having a certain view of the world and believing certain things work while others do not.

Optimizing your efforts

The problem with brute force is that you can’t brute force everything simultaneously. Unlike a simple combination lock, your endeavor probably has many moving pieces and many “combinations” to get right. You must pick your battles. Thus, it’s important to focus on one objective at a time and only move to the next objective once the previous one has been solved. This forces you to focus on what’s important and remove everything else.

For instance, let’s say you just moved to Brazil and started learning Portuguese. The primary objective here is to become conversational. This main objective can be broken down into various phases. The first phase might be to learn conversational words and understand at least 10-20% of daily conversations.

In order to get to the 20% point, you write down every word that you don’t understand. Then, at the end of each day, you look all of them up and memorize their translations. You keep doing that every day until you understand about 20% of the spoken language.

Once you reach that phase, the next phase becomes understanding 50% of spoken speech. Daisy chaining these phases helps you to get from zero to your main objective in a controlled and predictable manner.

When it comes to making money, your objective could be to make $100/mo. But if you break it down into various phases, you can attack this problem in a predictable and sequential matter. The first phase might be to pick a good product. The second phase might be to get engagement from the audience. The third phase might be to market to that audience more efficiently. And so on.

The currency of hustle

When you’re grinding it out and brute forcing success, it’s very difficult to know whether what you’re doing is moving you closer to your goals or not. You need metrics. You need data. You need an effective feedback loop.

There’s a currency at play here. This currency informs you whether you’re on the right path or just wasting time. It’s not money. It’s also not time. It’s shipping. The faster you create, the faster you make things, and the faster you put them out into the world to see, the faster you learn what works or doesn’t work.

The opposite of shipping is perfection. At this stage, perfection is your worst enemy. I’m not saying that perfection is necessarily a bad thing. It’s good practice to create high-quality products, but you have to know what the product or service is first. When you’re trying to find your beachhead in a crowded market, your job is to make something; perfection can wait until later.

If you’re brute forcing success, forget perfection. Nobody cares about it. I’m more than certain that your customers don’t. All they care about is whether what you’re creating solves their problems and makes their lives a little bit more comfortable and better off.

Hustle dream team

Last but not least, even if you internalize everything above, it’s important to surround yourself with people who can push you.  Surrounding yourself with people who make shit happen helps exponentially. After all, it’s true what they say: you’re really the average of the five people you interact with. This has been an integral part of my success.

I’ve been fortunate because back during my college years I accidentally became involved with very successful guys who got a lot done. They worked hard, build lots of products and essentially printed money. Although we don’t really keep in touch anymore, merely seeing them work so hard and achieve so much in such a short period of time truly opened my eyes to what’s really possible.

I can certainly tell you that it’s one thing to talk about making some “bucket list,” writing down your goals, or saying that you’ll launch this or that “this year,” but it’s entirely a different thing to witness a bunch of guys accomplishes a month’s worth of tasks in one day with your own eyes. That’s what I call compressing time.

If you can’t physically surround yourself with winners, the next best step is to join an online community where people are making moves. Although I’m part of several online communities, there’s only one (a paid mastermind community) that comes somewhat close to being physically surrounded by hustlers.

Most importantly, you must enjoy the ride. There’s hardly a point of suffering through what might seem an endless tunnel when all you’re looking forward is the tropical ending. Whenever I embark on a new venture or project, I view it as a puzzle that must be cracked—at all costs. I actually enjoy the ride.

I also know that if I keep tinkering with the moving pieces, I’ll eventually stumble on the right combination that will pay exponential dividends for the rest of my life and also serve as a jumping point for the next challenge.

Interested in building your own passive, location-independent business? Want to avoid needless trial and error? Want to start off on the right foot under proper guidance?

Check out the Maverick Mentorship program. It has helped 100s of guys just like yourself to build their own business. Click here to learn more

4 Comments

  1. I am obsessed with my own blog and membership website. I want to succeed and earn more money than I am from my crappy 9 – 5 job. I would do whatever it takes in order to get what I want. Unlike most people, I refuse to give up my dreams, continue working at a job I do not like, and continue living a mediocre life.

  2. This is such a poignant article. From having realistic expectations to keeping motivated and positive people around you, finding your success and reaching your goals is a marathon. A newbie to programming doesn’t just become a UX/UI designer. Hopefully, we all find the right combination.

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