Maverick Traveler

Location Independence, Geo Arbitrage, Individual Freedom

The Most Important Rule When Starting Your Business

I recently decided to expand the way I spread my message by creating various videos on YouTube. After all, if a picture is worth a thousand words, a video must be worth a million words. So far, I’m enjoying the journey and plan on creating different content and different channels.

Spending lots of time on YouTube while viewing all kinds of interesting content has allowed me to discover creators that I wouldn’t have discovered any other way. The majority of these creators don’t have their own blog or any other channel (or at least don’t market them on their channels), so their main presence is exclusively on YouTube. Many of them aren’t selling their own products either; they’re creating videos for fun. Nevertheless, one nice thing about a huge platform such as YouTube is that there’s an automatic way of making money: become a YouTube partner.

Earning money with YouTube is simple. Make a video, toggle the setting so the ads appear and wait for the money to come in. Advertisers pay Google/YouTube for the ads to be shown, Google keeps a portion and the rest goes back to the video creator.

It’s a win/win for everyone, especially for people who’re starting from scratch. That means you don’t need to spend years building out the brand and then creating products; advertisers simply pay per video views, regardless if the channel has 1,000 subscribers or 1 million. Naturally, the more people see your videos, the more money you make. (Although, because advertising is based on supply and demand, the amount you per view is largely dependent on what kind of content you have.)

Of course, that doesn’t mean you’ll become automatically rich. First of all, if you don’t have a large following, the amount of money you’ll make will be very little. It takes a relatively decent audience (typically, more than 5-10k subscribers) to see a steady income that can cover your cable bill.

The second problem is much bigger and negates the benefits provided above. It’s the fact that you’re using YouTube’s platform for your content instead of building on your own platform.

When you create your own content and then host it on another platform, your content is governed by the platform’s rules. This forces you to abide by the platform’s rules. The first issue is that you give up some of those rights to the content. The second issue is that  you’re dictated a certain way to make money and no other way.

So, if you create the best videos in the world and put them on YouTube, you can no longer charge whatever you want for them.

Last week, YouTube introduced a new monetization policy. Starting next month, people with less than 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours of views will no longer be able to monetize their videos. Once you reach those thresholds, you can reapply to the program for a chance to be able to show ads on your videos and get a portion of the profits.

This announcement affected thousands and even millions of creators out there. Although creators that don’t meet those thresholds weren’t making much money to begin with, it still signaled that YouTube was becoming more picky about the videos it wanted to be associated with.

But, mostly, this was a signal of something much more important: YouTube is now more concerned with its advertisers than with its up-and-coming creators. YouTube had grown up. Not everyone was automatically welcomed to its gated garden. And if you want to be part of the club, you need to go through strict checks. It’s like going through face control at a posh club instead of a cozy coffee shop that’s open to everyone.

This underlines something I’ve been talking for a long: it’s very risky to build important things on someone else’s platform. You’re building a dream house on a land you don’t own. Thus, you could have the most amazing content, but you’ll always be rewarded according to the most common denominator: in this case, specific ad rates that advertisers negotiate with Google, YouTube’s parent company.

Own the platform

Building your dream house on a land you don’t own is always a poor business strategy unless you make a little tweak: build that dream house on a land you do own. That means owning the platform.

Creating your own platform should be the cornerstone of any business, especially online businesses. I’m no exception. My own platform is Maverick Traveler (and some of the other sites I own). This is where all my content resides. This way I’m in absolute full control of the content I create, how I choose to present it to my readers, and how I monetize my products and services.

When you create content on another platform or channel, you’re powerless to do anything if those platform’s owners deem it unsatisfactory for their audience. If they don’t like you or your channel, they can flick a switch and make you disappear. That will destroy years of hard work and eliminate any revenue.

But when you own that platform, nothing like that can happen. Unless you screw up technically and delete your own site (and there’s backup for that), your site and your brand (along with your products and services) will always be online, 24/7, 365 days per year.

Hard questions

One of the side-effects of building on your own platform is that you’re forced to think through difficult problems. First of all, you need to decide what your brand is all about. If you’re just creating random stuff on YouTube or Instagram, you don’t really need a specific strategy; you can create random videos or post random pictures, but when you create your own platform, there needs to be a unified theme that generates serves a specific objective.

Creating and uploading a video to huge platforms like YouTube is straightforward because YouTube is an already establishment video platform, a problem that was solved when the company was being built. There’s also no discovery problem because your video is simply a search away from the site’s visitors.

On the other hand, when you create a brand tomorrow on your own server, nobody will know about it. Thus, you need to worry about how others will discover it and why what you do will be relevant to them. It’s much better to solve these problems in the beginning than after five years of fruitless labor where you’ve created lots of videos or written many articles but nobody knows who you are.

Leveraging other platforms

While it’s critically important to build your own platform, don’t simply discount other platforms. They have their uses as well. In fact, the best strategy is a hybrid one where you cultivate your own platform and leverage the other platforms to spread your message.

For instance, you can have a main authority site or a personal brand that hosts your articles and other types of content. And then you can use other platforms for spreading that message. It’s a strategy I’ve been using for more than a decade for great results. My main site is hosted here along with all the articles I’ve ever written. But, I also leverage other platforms, like YouTube for reaching new types of audiences.

To be sure, building your own platform requires an initial investment. You must provision a server to host your own content. You must design and build a site. Build products and services. Do marketing and customer acquisition.

But, all of this is something must do anyway in order to be successful. It’s not a question of “if” these questions need to be addressed—it’s a question of “when.” And, it’s much better to address those issues now while your brand is evolving, and you have an array of options than in some distant future when your brand has matured and your options are much more limited.


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1 Comment

  1. The people of YouTube do not surprise me regarding demonetization. They want videos that are going to make them richer, more famous, etc. I would like to create YouTube videos myself. But, I just stick with my written blog. At least I do not have to worry about competing with other bloggers concerning popularity and monetization.

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