Maverick Traveler

Location Independence, Geo Arbitrage, Individual Freedom

Random thoughts on Brazil

Some thoughts on Brazil after a year of living in no specific order.

  • Brazil is the only country in the world where some people would tell me I look 100% Brazilian.  Interesting because I don’t quite fit in in my birth country nor my current (adopted) country.
  • If you want to see real (stereotypical) Brazil, go to Bahia state and around that area.
  • Brazilians are obsessed with beer and football.  It didn’t take long before I become obsessed with both as well and I couldn’t care less about the either before.
  • Everyone in Brazil has a favorite football team.  What’s yours?
  • Brazilians drink moderately (mostly beer) but eventually stop.  I have rarely seen a visibly drunk Brazilian (male or female).
  • In Brazil, all foreigners are given a fit-all label ‘gringo’.  That term originally came from Mexico to mean ‘green—go (away)’ referring to the green uniforms of the US soldiers.  American in Mexico? Gringo. Russian in Mexico? Not gringo.  But you will be a gringo in Brazil if you were not born there.  Even though Brazilians do not consider it condescending (it just means foreigner), I personally wouldn’t like to be labeled merely as ‘a foreigner’ if, let’s say, I was living in Brazil on a permanent basis.
  • Brazil is incredible diverse country.  It’s difficult to comprehend this thought unless you travel around.  One of my regrets is that I didn’t travel around when I was living in Rio for a year.  When I started to travel around the states of Minas Gerais and Sao Paulo, I was impressed with the difference of food, and especially how different the people acted and spoke.
  • Brazilians are very proud of their nationality.  I got the feeling of segregation in some way as one can be either a Brazilian or someone else (regardless of nationality).  Every time I met a Brazilian, they would always ask how long I’d been in Brazil and if I liked it here. Always expecting a positive affirmation, the latter question seemed to me as an ego boost, than to satisfy their curiosity.   Yes, I like your country.  Yes, I’d love to come back.  However, I like other countries as well for other reasons and Brazil is far from perfect.
  • It’s difficult to create a strong friendship with a Brazilian (in Rio).  Most of the friendships I’ve created were with other foreigners.  The only Brazilian who I consider a good friend was actually someone who lived in America for eight years (18-26) and is more Americanized anyway.
  • There are really two types of Brazilians: those who lived in Brazil all of their life, and those who traveled/lived a bit abroad.  I found the latter to be more open in terms making any kind of connection; while the former more close minded about dealing with foreigners.
  • Cariocas (Rio residents) are flaky creatures.  I can’t blame them because time moves slower in Rio and commitments take a backseat to enjoying life.  It’s completely normal to invite someone over for 7pm, and have them show up at 10:30pm.  It comes with the territory.  After a while, I stopped moving against the current and became a bit flaky myself.  Don’t take it personal because that’s never the intention.  If you’re very punctual, forget Rio; try Sao Paulo instead.
  • Brazilians are very diverse, and it’s easy to look Brazilian yourself.  If you look Brazilian, your experience will be vastly different than someone who screams ‘gringo!’.  The latter brings more curiosity from opposite sex, and more chances of getting into trouble.
  • Every major area (Sao Paulo, Rio, Belo Horizonte) has its own dialect. Speaking Rio’s street dialect outside Rio de Janeiro state brings negative connotations.
  • Going out in Brazil is very different than going out in western countries.  Confidence, persuasion, determination is the key.
  • Brazilian women are extremely sexy, feminine and passionate.
  • Rio de Janeiro is one of the most beautiful – if not the most beautiful – city in the world.
  • Rio de Janeiro is suffering from gingo fatigue and will most likely increase in the future as the sites of both the Olympics and World Cup.
  • Rio de Janeiro International Airport is one of the most ugliest I’ve seen.
  • Sao Paulo is a very underrated city.
  • As a foreigner/gringo, you come with a built-in reputation as a sex tourist (especially in Rio/North East).
  • Brazil’s food is healthier.  I ate some ‘unhealthy’ food in Brazil: white rice, white bread, french fries, acai (full of sugar) but I never gained weight.  I would blow up if I tried the same diet in US.
  • Training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu with the best in the world followed by a dip in Copacabana beach is truly exhilarating.
  • Brazil is one of the few countries that has no internal conflicts or external enemies.
  • Brazilians do not consider themselves Latino(a)s
  • Brazilians are very courteous in general.  If someone tripped or tapped me by accident in a crowded place, they would always say ‘sorry’.  I do not have this feeling in America.
  • Brazilians are very relaxed people (especially in Rio).  I’ve rarely seen any sort of tension between individuals; fights were even rarer.  Life is about enjoyment and not stress over meaningless issues.
  • Even though Brazil prides itself as ‘country for all’ (o pais de todos) you are and always will be a foreigner (gringo) if you were not born in Brazil, no matter how long you’ve been living there.  In contrast, in America, if you’re living there for sometime, you are pretty much an American.
  • Brazil is a place I can see myself living in.  I never felt like this in Central America, not in Peru, nor Argentina or Mexico.  But Brazil – I can see myself moving to and living the rest of my life in Rio de Janeiro or Sao Paulo, and take vacations to the coast or to Bahia.  I never felt like this in Lima, Peru or Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • Brazilian Portuguese is cooler than the abrasive sounding European Portuguese.  Even more so when spoken by a woman.
  • Portuguese is very underrated.  Many people spent a lot of time in Spanish-speaking Latin America and cross into Brazil speaking Spanish.  But Brazil is arguably the most important country in Latin America and Portuguese is a very logical and beautiful language.

Did I miss anything?

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23 Comments

  1. As requested, here is my Brazilian feedback:
    – Brazilians are a big mix of cultures / peoples, so we might look like people from almost or all part of the world. So it might be true. 😉
    – I don’t have a favourite team! I cheer only for Brazil!
    – You can also be called “alemao” = German / It’s basically because the stereotype of foreigners is like Germans: blond, tall and blue eyes.
    – I guess it is quite normal to ask a foreigner how long they have been there or what brought them there. Yes, usually people ask that and I have read / heard that foreigners find it strange to be asked so many times weather they like Brazil or not. Well, 99% of the time when I said I was from Brazil people have said: Really? Oh…I ve been there and I loved the country/people. Or, Oh…I really would like to visit your country, I have friends that have said lovely things about it. And of course, Brazilians might come back home and tell the others that Brazil is very liked abroad and if they have not been abroad or met many foreigners, they might want to confirm that information.
    – Difficult to create friendships? !!!! Maybe because in Rio locals are already so used to see so many foreigners and they dont care much about them anymore. If you go outside Rio people might be more interested in making friends with you. Well, think about Paris. French people in Paris might be so tired of so many tourists making their city more crowed, I would not like many tourists as well.
    – I guess the two type of people would be applicable not only for Brazil but for any country in the world.
    – You really have to get used to the Brazilian time. However, it is applicable to personal appointments like parties with friends and families. We KNOW which events we are supposed to arrive on time and which events we are supposed to arrive 30m-2 h late. Can’t help you with that. You gotta live in the country to get used to the Brazilian time and get adapted to it.
    – I agree about the dialects. But we could consider it only different type of slang.
    – Hahahah! Perfect comment about going out in Brazil. For a women, I feel so relaxed here in Europe.
    – Agre
    – Agre
    – I have never been to the airport in Brazil but be sure that all of the major airports have been under construction for the mega-events coming in 2014 and 2016.
    – Yes! Foreigners think that the only place to visit in Brazil is Rio. That is actually great for us so the other beautiful places don’t get crowded! 😉 Kidding. Basically there a few people that get interested in visiting Sao Paulo and other capitals around the country. They really don’t know what they are missing! But I will make sure make many posts about them! 😉
    – I agree! If you are a guy, alone or with only male friends going to Rio or North-east, yes, people will think you came only to have “fun”, get drunk, etc. Of course it will depend on your behaviour as well and reason for visiting Brazil.
    – Yes! Brazilian food is really healthier if compared to other cuisines. Oh…dont talk about that, you make me hungry! Acai! It’s been almost 2 years I dont have that!
    – Right! So glad Brazil has been so peaceful. Everywhere I have been, I have received smiles when they saw my passports. (oh..I lie, in Poland they did not!). But I was surprised when the police at the border of China gave me a BIG smile looking at my passport. 😀
    – Kind of true. I guess it is because most of Latin America speak Spanish and dance salsa, and…we don’t!
    – Oh how I agree! I remember people were very rude in the buses in Los Angeles. Sorry? Really rare to hear that!
    – Fights might happen in night clubs. As you said, guys are very persuasive and if there is a dispute, groups can start a fight. I have seen a few. But usually when they are teenagers.
    – I agree about the “pais de todos”. However, you have to remember that the US is a country of foreigners. How many people have immigrated there? It is the same here in the UK. Even if you were born here or in the US, people might look at your and say: But where do your parents come from? In Brazil it does not happen. There are not so many foreigners like UK and US. So yes, you will probably be called Gringo and Alemao for the rest of your time there, but remember that it does not negative. Many words we use might be considered “negative” but they are just a “lovely” way to call you.
    – Let me know when you move to Brazil them 😉 We can start a travel bloggers’ meeting! 😉
    – I agree! OMG…I hope my Portuguese friends dont read it! 😉 But sometimes I wish I could talk with the Portuguese accent. It is cool.
    – TOTALLY agree. And you can see it by the popularity of Brazilian songs. It is quite common for me to hear Bossa Nova in metros, restaurants, bars, hotels around Europe! Amazing! And I guess it is because the language has a beautiful sound! I LOVE IT!
    Well, can’t think about something else now. The post was long….but did worth it!

    • mavtraveler

      June 1, 2010 at 12:42 am

      Great feedback from a Brazilian themselves.

      Glad to see the other side of the coin, especially on the ‘Why it’s hard to make friends in Rio’ because gringos come and go, etc.

      Overall I had a very positive experience in BR and continue to tell everyone about it.

  2. Any thoughts on the overall safety(crime) situation?

    • mavtraveler

      June 1, 2010 at 12:44 am

      Not a single issue.

      I was joking with a guy in Belo Horizonte that I will say the following statement, “I never had one security issue in Rio” only after I’ve left Rio, and the statement, “never had one security issue in Brazil” when I’m safely on the airplane back to the US.

    • I guess people just have to discover more about Brazil OUTSIDE Rio which is the most dangerous city, but it is where every tourist want to make a stop. So they think Rio is about crime, drug dealing, ‘favelas”, beach and carnival and will keep this image about the Brazil.
      Just remember: Rio is an unique city – beautiful but the very poor very close to the very rich. In all other cities around the country you will not see a big contrast like you see there.
      Dont get the Rio’s attributes to form your image about Brazil. Go discover the rest of the country. There are lots of Brazil’s.

      • mavtraveler

        June 2, 2010 at 10:35 am

        That’s a very good point. Rio is unique city in Brazil. The other cities I’ve visited: Belo Horizonte and Sao Paulo are not surrounded by favelas, and are perfectly safe, etc.

  3. Interesting thoughts and observations about Rio and other parts of Brazil. Drinking was the same in Argentina, many people drink, but never really saw an overly drunk person, it’s quite nice. Looks like I would enjoy a lot of the Rio cultural qualities, thanks for sharing!

  4. Hey Maverick Traveler,
    Nice post, I agree and can relate to almost all your points as I have spent considerable time in Brasil. It’s truly a magical and fascinating place, one that hooks you for life!
    Just one question: how did you manage to stay in Brasil for 14 straight months? Did you have a student visa? An investor visa? Or just overstaying your tourist visa?
    If you don’t want to post that publically, feel free to email me.

    Valeu,

    Lorenzo.

  5. Great post, makes me want to visit and live in Brazil! I had a similar sort of experience in Japan (lived there for two years) and there are a lot of interesting contrasts.

    • mavtraveler

      June 3, 2010 at 1:55 pm

      Nice blog.

      I see you mention that Japanese is not nearly as difficult as people think.

      Would be cool to compare Japan with Brazil. Do you have any interesting thoughts on Japan you can share?

  6. In the spirit of TravelholicA’s post above…

    – If you want to see real (stereotypical) Japan, you can find it in and around Tokyo. While Tokyo itself is a really big city, a train ride for a couple of hours in any direction will put you in the countryside and you will see a completely different side to Japan there. Kyoto and Kamakura would be fun, if there were less tourists.

    – Japanese people are obsessed with beer , football and baseball. I am quite obsessed with beer, but never got around to liking football. One of the best things ever though, was beer girls at a baseball game at Tokyo Dome. They are girls with a beer keg strapped to their back who go around giving you refills. Beer. Girls. Beer girls. Yum…

    – Everyone in Japan has a favorite baseball team, and a lot of the time it’s either Tokyo Giants or Hanshin Tigers.

    -Japanese people drink moderately (mostly beer), though drunk salarymen in Ginza are a common site.

    – In Japan, all foreigners are given a fit-all label ‘gaijin’. The term literally means ‘outside person’. Some foreigners prefer the term ‘gaikokujin’ which means ‘outside country person’, because gaijin by itself could potentially carry the connotation of being ‘outside’ of everything, including Japanese society as a whole. Japanese people don’t consider the term ‘gaijin’ derogatory, and personally I don’t mind, as its part and parcel of the Japan experience, even if you plan to live there permanently (more on this later).

    – Japan is a diverse country, but probably not as diverse as Brazil. There are however differences in language, food, personality and culture in general depending on where you are in the country. Traditionally the East is a lot more conservative and reserved, while in Kansai the people are friendlier and the culture is a little bit more lively (but this is a sweeping generalization to which there are of course countless exceptions).

    – Japanese are very proud of their nationality. Every time I met a Japanese person, they would always ask how long I’d been in Japan and if I liked it here. However, I found that this was more out of curiosity rather than a desire to boost their ego. I got the feeling that most Japanese people felt that other countries didn’t really care about Japan.

    – Personally, I found it very easy to create long-lasting friendships with Japanese natives in Japan, and found it difficult to relate to other foreigners living there. In Japan, this appears to have a lot to do with Japanese language ability.

    – There are really two types of Japanese: those who lived in Japan all of their life, and those who traveled/lived a bit abroad. I found the latter to be more or less indifferent towards foreigners (probably thanks to their overseas experience); while the former very excited about meeting foreigners/practising their language skills.

    – The Japanese are amongst the most punctual people on Earth. When a meeting, be it social or business, starts at 12:30, it means everyone will be waiting for you by 12:25, and arriving any later is considered extremely rude. This extends to buses, trains, or generally anything that is timed.

    – Japanese society is almost completely homegenous, so you will only be mistaken for Japanese if you are of Korean, Chinese or otherwise East Asian descent. If you look Japanese, your experience will be vastly different than someone who screams ‘gaijin!’. The latter brings (a lot) more curiosity from opposite sex, and more chances of getting into trouble, and excellent adventures for that matter.

    – Every major area (Tokyo, Touhoku, Kansai) has its own dialect. Speaking Kansai-ben is kinda dirty and cool, a lot of Japanese comedians put this accent on deliberately.

    – Going out in Japan as a Gaijin is absolutely awesome. You get treated like a celebrity wherever you go.

    – Japanese women are extremely sexy, feminine and passionate.

    – Tokyo is an extremely ugly city, but has some of the most surreal beauty imaginable if you look for it.

    – Tokyo’s Gaijin population is more or less transient, i.e. not increasing or decreasing. You don’t get stared at as much in Tokyo, but step out of the city and it’s all eyes on you.

    – Narita International Airport is one of the most ugliest I’ve seen. But airports are generally ugly.

    – As a male gaijin, you come with a built-in reputation as a bit of a playboy juggling women, and after the first few months of living in Japan, this is usually true!

    – Japan’s food is healthier. You can get good food with all natural ingredients at every street corner. Also, people GIVE A SHIT about the quality of their food, and this is not just foodies. I’ve had conversations with people who are otherwise uninterested in food about the exact origin and species of the mushroom in a given miso-soup. It is extremely difficult to eat unhealthily in Japan.

    – Training Kendo (Japanese sword fighting) with the best in the world followed by a dip in an Onsen/Sentou is pretty fucking awesome too.

    – Japan is one of the few countries that has no internal conflicts or external enemies. However they are not liked in mainland East Asia, stemming primarily from their quite literally, atrocious behaviour in WW2 and the Chinese media playing up these facts. Also, war appears to be brewing on the Korean peninsula and Japan may get drawn into it in some capacity.

    – Japanese are very courteous in general. If someone tripped or tapped me by accident in a crowded place, they would always say ‘sorry’. I do not have this feeling in the UK.

    – Japan is a country for the Japanese, and even with Japanese citzenship and native level Japanese (and even, being _born_ in Japan) you will always be a gaijin.

    – Japan is a place I can see myself living in. Being born in the UK with my parents from Pakistan, I don’t feel at home in either of those two countries, but the Japanese mindset is the one that I’ve found most congruent with my own (though conversely, it is at times diametrically opposed). It is the country I would settle down in and vacation in East Asia.

    – Japanese is an extremely fun language to learn. It can get repetitive learning the characters (there are 2000) but once you get over that hurdle (and it really is a lot easier than it seems once you have a system) it is an expressive, simple and regular language that you can have a lot of good times with.

  7. mavtraveler

    June 4, 2010 at 2:49 pm

    Excellent post. Appreciate you taking the time to post it.

    I was hesitant of going to Japan because of my lack of language, but now I’m pretty curious!

  8. Brazil is the only country in the world where some people would tell me I look 100% Brazilian.  Interesting because I don’t quite fit in in my birth country nor my current (adopted) country-INDEED, WE HAVE OPEN DOORS DO IMIGRANTS. If you want to see real (stereotypical) Brazil, go to Bahia state and around that area-I THINK THAT MINAS GERAIS OR SAO PAULO ALSO ARE NICE(AND CHEAPER). Brazilians are obsessed with beer and football.  It didn’t take long before I become obsessed with both as well and I couldn’t care less about the either before-JUST AS THE GOOD CACHAÇA, IT WON´T BE ANY GOOD BEER ON MARKETS, WE OFTEN SAYS YOU CAME HERE TO DRINK DIRTY WATER INSTEED. Everyone in Brazil has a favorite football team.  What’s yours? –CORINTHIANS AND FLAMENGO, ALMOST A RELIGION, FOR ME CORINTHIANSBrazilians drink moderately (mostly beer) but eventually stop.  I have rarely seen a visibly drunk Brazilian (male or female)INDEED EVEN DRUNK KEEP UR DISCIPLINE, IT HELPS MAINTEN YOUT THEETHS. In Brazil, all foreigners are given a fit-all label ‘gringo’.  That term originally came from Mexico to mean ‘green—go (away)’ referring to the green uniforms of the US soldiers.  American in Mexico? Gringo. Russian in Mexico? Not gringo.  But you will be a gringo in Brazil if you were not born there.  Even though Brazilians do not consider it condescending (it just means foreigner), I personally wouldn’t like to be labeled merely as ‘a foreigner’ if, let’s say, I was living in Brazil on a permanent basis-USE A FLAMENGO/CORINTHIANS T-SHIRT AND VOILÁ. Brazil is incredible diverse country.  It’s difficult to comprehend this thought unless you travel around.  One of my regrets is that I didn’t travel around when I was living in Rio for a year.  When I started to travel around the states of Minas Gerais and Sao Paulo, I was impressed with the difference of food, and especially how different the people acted and spoke EVEN FOR ME BORN AND RAISED HERE IS NICE AS WELL. Brazilians are very proud of their nationality.  I got the feeling of segregation in some way as one can be either a Brazilian or someone else (regardless of nationality).  Every time I met a Brazilian, they would always ask how long I’d been in Brazil and if I liked it here. Always expecting a positive affirmation, the latter question seemed to me as an ego boost, than to satisfy their curiosity.   Yes, I like your country.  Yes, I’d love to come back.  However, I like other countries as well for other reasons and Brazil is far from perfect-AS SAID”IT MAY BE BAD BUT IS MINE”. It’s difficult to create a strong friendship with a Brazilian (in Rio).  Most of the friendships I’ve created were with other foreigners.  The only Brazilian who I consider a good friend was actually someone who lived in America for eight years (18-26) and is more Americanized anyway-HARD TO REALY TRUST SOMEONE, AND WITHE GRINGOS AREN´T SEEN AS GOOD PEOPLE, SAD BUT TRUTH. There are really two types of Brazilians: those who lived in Brazil all of their life, and those who traveled/lived a bit abroad.  I found the latter to be more open in terms making any kind of connection; while the former more close minded about dealing with foreigners-JUST AS SAID BEFORE,  THE MIDIA I THINK. Cariocas (Rio residents) are flaky creatures.  I can’t blame them because time moves slower in Rio and commitments take a backseat to enjoying life.  It’s completely normal to invite someone over for 7pm, and have them show up at 10:30pm.  It comes with the territory.  After a while, I stopped moving against the current and became a bit flaky myself.  Don’t take it personal because that’s never the intention.  If you’re very punctual, forget Rio; try Sao Paulo instead-GRINGOS USUALY GETS BETTER IN SAO  PAULO IF AREN´T JUST FUN THEY´RE SEARCHING. Brazilians are very diverse, and it’s easy to look Brazilian yourself.  If you look Brazilian, your experience will be vastly different than someone who screams ‘gringo!’.  The latter brings more curiosity from opposite sex, and more chances of getting into trouble-FIND A FRIEND, OR A CORINTHIANS T-SHIRT. Every major area (Sao Paulo, Rio, Belo Horizonte) has its own dialect. Speaking Rio’s street dialect outside Rio de Janeiro state brings negative connotations-NEVER USE CARIOCA SLANG OUTSIDE RIO . Going out in Brazil is very different than going out in western countries.  Confidence, persuasion, determination is the key-THINGS ARE CHANGING BUT… Brazilian women are extremely sexy, feminine and passionate-NEVER FOUND ANYTHING BETTER. Rio de Janeiro is one of the most beautiful – if not the most beautiful – city in the world-IT MAY BE BECAUSE I´M PAULIST, BUT RIO FOR ME ARE JUST GRINGO RATRAP THAT SUCKS. Rio de Janeiro is suffering from gingo fatigue and will most likely increase in the future as the sites of both the Olympics and World Cup. Rio de Janeiro International Airport is one of the most ugliest I’ve seen-BELEVIME THERE ARE WORST. Sao Paulo is a very underrated city-THE BEST CITY FOR ME,OF COURSE I LIVE HERE BUT SEEN OTTER PLACES. As a foreigner/gringo, you come with a built-in reputation as a sex tourist (especially in Rio/North East)-YES CREDBILITY IS THE KEY AROUND HERE, AND YOU ONLY MESS ONCE WITH SOMEONE,BUT A CORINTHIANS T-SHIRT HELPS. Brazil’s food is healthier.  I ate some ‘unhealthy’ food in Brazil: white rice, white bread, french fries, acai (full of sugar) but I never gained weight.  I would blow up if I tried the same diet in US-OUR WAY OF LIFE THAT IS HEALTIER. Training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu with the best in the world followed by a dip in Copacabana beach is truly exhilarating-SAO PAULO AND OTHER PLACES ALSO HAVE GOOD JIU JITSU, AND BAHIA IS OUR BOXING CRADLE. Brazil is one of the few countries that has no internal conflicts or external enemies-YES A T-SHIRT OF THE “SELEÇÃO BRASILEIRA” IS ALMOST LIKE A SWISS PASS. Brazilians do not consider themselves Latino(a). Brazilians are very courteous in general.  If someone tripped or tapped me by accident in a crowded place, they would always say ‘sorry’.  I do not have this feeling in America-TO BE HUMBLE AND EDUCATED, AND RESPECTFUL IS OUR MOST PRIZED VALUES. Brazilians are very relaxed people (especially in Rio).  I’ve rarely seen any sort of tension between individuals; fights were even rarer.  Life is about enjoyment and not stress over meaningless issues-BUT WHEN IT HAPPENS… Even though Brazil prides itself as ‘country for all’ (o pais de todos) you are and always will be a foreigner (gringo) if you were not born in Brazil, no matter how long you’ve been living there.  In contrast, in America, if you’re living there for sometime, you are pretty much an American-UNLESS A CORINTHIANS/FLAMENGO T-SIRT IS WORN. Brazil is a place I can see myself living in.  I never felt like this in Central America, not in Peru, nor Argentina or Mexico.  But Brazil – I can see myself moving to and living the rest of my life in Rio de Janeiro or Sao Paulo, and take vacations to the coast or to Bahia.  I never felt like this in Lima, Peru or Buenos Aires, Argentina. Brazilian Portuguese is cooler than the abrasive sounding European Portuguese.  Even more so when spoken by a woman-ALMOST ANOTHER LANGUAGE. Portuguese is very underrated.  Many people spent a lot of time in Spanish-speaking Latin America and cross into Brazil speaking Spanish.  But Brazil is arguably the most important country in Latin America and Portuguese is a very logical and beautiful language-PRETTY HARD TO MASTER AS WELL.

    • Thanks for your feedback.  Good to see locals commenting.

    • Sao Paulo is the only civilized place in Brazil. The rest is exotic, good for a week, maybe. Avoid Bahia, it is dirty . The African cultural influence is overrated. Rio is beautiful, but even cariocas are tired of the BS , narcissism, corruption and general disonest vanity culture of the city. Lots of cariocas in Sao Paulo now.
      What foreigners think are Brazilian goddesses are usually sluts from poor neighborhoods in Rio who go to the South Area (rich area) trying to get a sugar daddy. They get one bang from them and post in blogs. Congratulations, you were number 1254.


  9.  In contrast, in America, if you’re living there for sometime, you are pretty much an American.” LOL…Really??? 

  10. Maybe because we had it too easy or just are lazy, we Brazilians lack the drive of Americans. I envy your determination.
    I see how you, Roosh, Roissy are intelligent and engaged on thinking, on analyzing things, and think to myself, no Brazilian gives a fuck about the life of the mind, it is just beer, soccer and beaches.
    Sometimes I think you guys, because America is stressed, confuse our laziness and lack of ambition with a ” capacity to relax and enjoy life”.
    Dont be so hard on America, it is still the best place in the world.
    The only thing you need to learn is to open up and relax, to learn to be among friends without an immediate goal.
    Want a game strategy in Brazil ? Dont use game. Just be friendly, talk. Let the girl be confortable with you. The rest will folllow.

    • I would say that I saw much more ambitions in Brazil then I saw in any other place! Brazilians were crazy to grow fast in company, make more money, work overtimes, build connections, etc.

  11. “Brazil is one of the few countries that has no internal conflicts or external enemies” … I woldn’t say that .. We live in civil war (police and drug dealers). and the police is getting an even WORST role in this shit

  12. I like your website and many of your texts but I really dont understand your position about Brazil. In some of your posts we only read compliments about the Brazilian way of life, while in others Brazil is hell on Earth.
    Take the portuguese language as an instance… here you say it is a “beautiful and logical” language and “cooler than the abrasive sounding European” version, but in other post you say that “Brazilian Portuguese sounds exactly like Portuguese but only when mumbled by a lazy drunk, completely wasted after a long night of cachaça and non-stop weed”.
    Above you write that “Brazil is a place I can see myself living in (…) I can see myself moving to and living the rest of my life in Rio de Janeiro or Sao Paulo, and take vacations to the coast or to Bahia.” and then, in other text, you say that Brazil is “the baddest country of them all (other South American nations)”. Two huge opposing statements, Mr Romney!
    Please man, can you clarify your readers on where you stand when it comes to Brazil? I’m curious. Did your opinion just too radically change, is this bipolar disorder or is there someone else writing in your blog, or what?
    Thanks

  13. Great!
    All you said is true!
    Except that Brazil is not a western country! Which it is!

  14. Eu amei seu texto, o achei muito bom.
    Eu sou carioca e realmente reconheci tudo que você mencionou.
    Parabéns!

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