I give you three reasons to visit Serbia:

Serbian Women

Serbian Women

Tall, dark and sexy.  Those were my first impressions of Serbian women after I landed in Belgrade’s Tesla International Airport.  Over the next few days, as I braved the chilly street of Serbia’s capital, my impressions were only strengthened, reinforced and solidified.

I’ve been with all kinds of women but there’s something very alluring about Slavic women.  First, they’re very feminine — they ooze femininity.  While the rest of the world is being infested with feminist cancer, Serbia—like the rest of Slavic countries—has simply been immune.  Seems like feminism and Slavs are like oil and water: they just don’t mix too well.  Of course, as an Eastern European guy, I’m also a bit biased having grown up around them from an early age.

My single gripe with Slavic women is that most of them have pale skin.  I’m not much into blondes and prefer my women to have a bit of color.  There’re Spaniards and Italians but they’re quickly going the way of their American counterparts: unfeminine, rude and bitchy.  Brazilian women fit this requirement perfectly with their sexy olive skin and bikini tans, but I’m miles away from the promised land.  (Having said that, I will never ever kick Christine Bell or her look-a-likes out of my bed.)

Enter Serbia.  Serbian women are Slavs but with dark, olive-skinned complexions of their Mediterranean counterparts.  They are tall, slim, have dark hair and striking eyes.  Result: the perfect combination of beauty and sexiness.

Serbia is a country rich in history.  For 500 years it was ruled by Ottoman Empire (Turks).  After its collapse, the region gained the notoriety of being known as the “Powder Keg of Europe” as the inciter of several conflicts leading to the outbreak of World War I.  After World War II it became one of the five republics of the newly formed Yugoslavia.  In 1991 — after more disastrous wars — it finally became an independent state.   The latest issue is the partly recognized Republic of Kosovo, and, as I quickly discovered, an interesting topic of conversation with the girls.

Serbia’s rich history, especially the long Turkish conquest which resulted in the voluntary – and involuntary – mixing of the races, might explain the dark and sexy complexion of the women.

Serbians speak Serbian, a south Slavic language, which is the same as Croatian and Montenegrin.  Unlike Croatians who use the Latin alphabet, Serbians use Cyrillic, so you might need to familiarize yourself with it to understand and read the signs (it’s very simple).  As a native Russian speaker, I could understand most of the written text but deciphering spoken speech was next to impossible.

Speaking English was never a problem as most Serbians (at least under 30) I’ve met spoke decent English.

It seems the more south in Europe you go, the more traditional and relationship-minded the women get.  The Balkans is home to some of the most traditional women in Europe.  Don’t expect to just fly in for a weekend, have one-night stands, and fly out.  The game is what I call “deep game” requiring a much greater time commitment.  It’s the kind of game I’ve been doing most of my life before getting a bit spoiled in Scandinavia.  Think weeks and months instead of days and weekends.  Serbs, like other Balkans, rarely have one-night stands, and will need to see you a few times before giving you access to the goods.  The good news is that the women are extremely loyal to their men, a far cry from the sluttiness of American women.

The bulk of my game consisted of day gaming around town.  I carried a city map with me at all times, making it easy to approach girls waiting at public squares, parks and bus stops.  Once they would answer my query, I would use standard game to transition the conversation and get a number.  Serbian girls are very warm and receptive to being approached.  One girl even volunteered to be my guide, showing me around the old fortress of Kalemegdan.

Good place to jumpstart your day game is to head one of the main city squares (I liked Trg Republica).  There you will see various people waiting for their friends to show up.  The other good place to spit game is the pedestrian street of Knez Mihailova.  Eye contact was rare, so if you’re the lucky recipient of some beauty’s curiosity, don’t hesitate and approach quickly.

Serbia was my first foray into the Balkans.  (I’ve also been to Romania, but it’s not usually considered to be part of the region.)  A week was just scratching the surface.  I certainly plan to do a longer trip next time and visit more countries in the area: Bosnia-Herzegovina, Montenegro, Macedonia, and possibly Bulgaria as well.

Read Next: Bulgarian Women: Dark, Mysterious, and More Balkan Than Slavic


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James Maverick

James Maverick

James Maverick used to work in a cubicle as a code monkey in Silicon Valley. Then, in 2007, he quit his job and a one-way ticket to Brazil. Ever since, he continued to travel, visiting over 85 countries and living in more than a dozen of them. He loved his location-independent lifestyle and has no plans to live in America.
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